Tokyo Ramen Street Tour

Japan takes pride in crafting the most delicious and most artistic bowls of ramen. While there are more than enough amazing ramen joints around Tokyo you can be sure to find some of the best of the best inside Tokyo Station’s Tokyo Ramen Street.

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There are 8 ramen shops that make up Tokyo Ramen Street and they’re all within an arm’s reach of each other. Each shop carries their own specialty, so it’s perfect when you’re traveling with a group of people who want to choose a place that’s just right for their taste buds.

While there are a variety of choices you can get at one ramen spot, we stayed faithful to their most recommended items.

1.) Gyoku


Speciality: Niboshi Ramen
Price: 1,150 JPY ($10.50 USD)
Gyoku ramen is known for their niboshi, or anchovy, based broth. It was accompanied by green onion, seaweed, fish cake, a soft-boiled egg and thin slices of extra tender slices of pork. The noodles were very thin, yet soaked full of niboshi goodness. Are anchovies not up your alley? Head to the next spot!

2.) Tokyo Ikaruga


Speciality: Pork Bone Broth
Price: 1,030 JPY ($9.50 USD)
Tokyo Ikaruga specializes in pork bone broth that soaks in their thin slices of pork that had firm outer edges, but were so tender at its center point. It carried the typical ramen ingredients: seaweed, a soft-boiled egg, fish cake, green onion. This one also had long and crunchy bamboo chutes with tiny grains. The ultimate umami for a pork-lover.

3.) Rokurinsha


Speciality: Tsukemen
Price: 1,060 JPY ($9.70 USD)
Rokurinsha specializes in tsukemen, a thick noodle dish that is meant to be dipped in a separate bowl of broth and slurped to enjoyment. They offer a bib as an option since dipping and slurping can get messy if you’re a newbie. This establishment always has a very long line, be sure to beat the lunch rush by heading over early or you might be stuck waiting over an hour in line for this bowl of goodness!

4.) Oreshiki Jun


Speciality: Pork
Price: 1,100 JPY ($10.00 USD)
Oreshiki Jun also specializes in pork accompanied by the usual ingredients alongside unconventional toppings such as wood ear mushrooms and pollack roe. Their thin slices of pork had crispy edges on the outer parts making the tender bites exciting to bite into. The atmosphere of this place seemed to be lively with a lot of young people and modern music making the experience overall pretty enjoyable.

5.) Tsujita Miso No Sho


Specialty: Miso-ramen
Price: 1,070 JPY ($9.70 USD)
This miso-based ramen packs a lot of flavor for a light broth using thick noodles that are more on the firmer side. It has finely chopped scallions and tender slices alongside even smaller blocks of pork with the basic bamboo chute and soft-boiled egg ingredients. This ramen is also accompanied by a bowl of rice with some pickled vegetables to complete the meal.

6.) Senmon Hirugao


Specialty: Shio-ramen
Price: 1,080 JPY ($9.80 USD)
Shio, meaning “salt-based,” gives a light tasting broth in contrast to your typical heavy fattier broth. Although the taste might seem simple, it uses shrimp wonton and a single shrimp to complement a basic dish. There are hints of yuzu that give it a light citrus texture. Order an side of wonton if you just can’t get enough of it in your ramen.

7.) Soranoiro


Specialty: Vegetarian/Gluten Free Options
Price: 1,080 JPY ($9.80 USD)
This is the only ramen shop on Tokyo Ramen Street that caters to its health-conscious clientele. With veggie ramen and gluten-free options, you might wonder if there’s a drastic difference in taste in comparison to other ramen bowls. This might’ve been the most hearty and full-flavored ramen we’ve come across. It uses a carrot-based broth and paprika noodles surrounded by cabbage, broccoli, tomato, fried lotus root, lentils and sweet potato. They even slap a side of spicy sauce on the rim of your bowl to give it a kick!

8.) Chiyogami


Specialty: Chuka-soba
Price: 1,170 JPY ($10.70 USD)
Chuka-soba literally means “Chinese noodles,” but with a Japanese flare. There is a lot of history to chuka-soba since ramen originated from China, but this shop claims to make the modern style noodle of what was once introduced to their beloved country. The noodles were thin and soft in a mildly salty broth with wontons, water greens, scallions, seaweed, soft-boiled eggs and an amazingly lengthy bamboo chute. They focus mostly on the art of Japanese tradition in their ramen and that is made clear from the moment you taste it.

There is so much more to explore at Tokyo Ramen Street. Each shop has so much more to offer than these recommended bowls we’ve tried. Got 10 bucks to spare and an appetite? This ramen bazaar is definitely worth a visit.

Can’t make it to Japan? Browse Sugoi Mart to satisfy your cravings for Japanese ramen!